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another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is educatio
we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the s
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
with this amazing and inspiring group of women. thank you so much. i chose to apply my science and policy education towards sustainability. i have worked for more than 15 years in community forestry, conservation based development, water quality science, fixing national environmental programs and now working to harmonize to build a natural [speaker not understood] in san francisco and the bay area. i've been lucky to work with dedicated and really big hearted people. all of whom believe we can and should do more to reduce our ecological footprint and are working to figure out how. through my work today at spur and with friends of the urban forest, we're helping to move the city forward towards a more sustainable future where there are trees and sidewalk gardens everywhere, where we have zero carbon and an imminently [speaker not understood], not just preparing climate change, but doing everything we can to stop it. i have an [speaker not understood] policy science education and social responsibility and to get to do it here in san francisco where most people believe this is the right direction to b
educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginalized young people, to take part. >> you menti
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
and change their lives forever and finishing education and get aing a job has helped individuals keeping off the block and along with that we are seek to go educate gangs so that they can continue their education and live their dreams and we call it family and education ever over everything and i'm very humble for receiving this apartward and thank you to general hospital foundation. >> (applause) . >> our second award will be presented by 98ian nay men. head of state and local relation, visa incorporated.. >> (applause) . >> good afternoon everyone god you look so great out there. i wish there was a camera up here so that you could see how wonderful you look especially with the backdrop of the ballpark. you know, i love this event for calm reasons usually it's because it's done around valentine's day and happy valentine's day by-the-way, and that is right by the day of my wedding anniversary and i'll be married 28 years torld tomorrow and pie my wife is not here today but happy anniversary sweet heart and this is beginning in 2004 and when judy good him and ellen newman and nancy vekc
strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budget will reresult in job losses of two million fewer jobs next year alone. that's on top of 750,000 jobs lost by the end of the year due to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close t
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
unified school district. and the purpose of that consent decree was to really provide equal educational opportunities for all children in san francisco. and ms. sullivan has certainly helped to make that happen. she has been teaching math at burton high school for the past eight years, and she has truly been a leader throughout her tenure. she currently teaches advanced algebra honors, algebra and geometry. and i can tell you the impact that a teacher can have on the life of a student from my own personal experience is really tremendous. and i certainly remember my geometry teacher to this day, [speaker not understood]. not only her math lessons, but the life lessons she taughtv me stayed with me. ms. sullivan is widely respected for her innovative teaching style. she encourages her students to learn from one another through creative and collaborative approaches. and she truly expects the very best of every one of her students. she was recently nominated to be one of the -- to be recognized as one of the best teachers in san francisco, and the person that nominated her said, ms. sulliva
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
everyday with programs specifically designed to increase wellness. health education in their lives these important life enhancing services are available for all residents of san francisco regardless of able to pay. and on top of that remarkable approach to service the hospital's quality care is the best in the bay area. last year the general won the patient safety first zero hero award as well as the california association of public hospital's safety net institute quality leaders top honest a bard ask that is why it's important to support the general hospital foundation and support programs at the hospital in the following video, stephanie tom matt see and crew beatifully cap toured two of those programs and their benefits: . >> i have eniwent to a friend who was building our new home and i went to step on an attached floor and it wasn't and i fell onto concrete. when character shier came to san francisco general hospital it was clear she had very significant injuries which includeddier to her pelvis and her heel bone. san francisco general is the only trauma center in the
the pentagon, half from nondefense programs. everything from education to national parks to meals on wheels. $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years. >> stephen: yeah, but it won't be that bad because there's no way america is going to last ten years. we have two tops. [laughter] obama is trying to scare us into responsible behavior. >> thousands of teachers and educators will be laid off. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks which means more delays at airports across the country. emergency responders, their ability to help communities respond to and recover from disasters will be degraded. federal prosecutors have to close cases and let criminals go. >> stephen: don't believe him nation, obama is trying to convince us the sequester is a terrible problem when in fact it's a terrible solution. it was born back in 2011 when obama wanted to raise the debt ceiling. the amount that america can borrow to pay its bills. it's sort of like raising the credit limit on your visa to pay off your mastercard if you had used your mastercard to pay for two trillion-dollar wars. but -- li
colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which toured in 1982
their children exposed to witchcraft and sex education, both taught in schools. >> they were encouraged to ask the devil to help. >> we found out what is in the textbooks. exactly the opposite of what the bible tells us and teaches us. illegal in germany. persecuted, fines, jail or loss of their children. most home schoolers are left alone by the government. against home schooling. in those nations where it is illegal, home schoolers risk losing their children. two of the worst nations are germany and sweden. if you would like to see what it would be like if it was banned in america if it was banned, come to sweden. this family had to take their family to finland in exile. >> we were forced out of our country. that make as stronger impact than i can imagine. this is our country. now we are pushed away from it. >> sweden is the toughest places to home school. michael donnelly of the home school administration. president of the nordic committee for human rights calls it a dictatorship where social workers tell parents what to do. >> they claim to be a democracy, far from it. it is a dictatorship
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
to them. >> a lot to them if you're trying to piece together a college education, not large in terms of the big picture, but because of the sequester, the department of education said that these grants are cut and new grants are cut by 38% across the board. anytime a new grant if it was $5,000 before, it's about $2,000 less than that. >> greta: here is what i don't get. this is almost 40% cut. and 38% cut. explain if the sequester was 2.4% cut across the board, why are the young people taking it at 38%, this cut? how, i would think they would have 2.4%. two things going on the. one it's spread over a shorter period of time. we're halfway into the fiscal year so that 2.4% cut has to actually go into effect over a shorter period of time. >> greta: make it 4.8 or 4.8 then. >> the other thing, there are things in the sequester that are called off making sure the men and women in afghanistan and iraq themselves aren't in harm's way. and vast majority of military spending not cut. so when there are programs that are targeted they take the disproportionate chunk of the hit and that's the po
. the story from our chief education correspondent rehema ellis. >> we want to go straight. >> reporter: this may look like an outing for a boating club, but it's a public school gym class. >> keep going! >> you have to use your arms and it also helps you move your legs, too. >> you live longer, stay healthy. >> everything's fun. >> reporter: in miami dade county where 14% of middle school students are obese, there is a new approach to physical education. catering to kids' interests. >> i like the bikes. that's my favorite. >> reporter: to get them up, moving and healthy. >> we are seeing kids over weight losing an average of eight pounds a semester. kids with eating disorders are putting on an average of two pounds a semester. >> reporter: despite strained finances for gym programs, no money turned out to be no problem. why? nearly a decade ago the school district's phys ed director enlisted the help of parents, the principal and superintendents and began raising money. >> we have been able to secure outside grant money, community resources. >> reporter: a school without a gym turned a
the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good a couple days ago. anne was there for the launch in
in order to get this. we are educated people with means. and resources. it's that difficult for us. the system is broken. not only that, if the high-tech companies really want to fulfill the jobs they have, that they say, however there are, 80,000 that microsoft put out the other day, that in the industry they don't have enough engineers, they are not going to be able to get that bill passed through this congress. thinking pragmatic i. will they won't get it done without a comprehensive piece. what rand paul did today is maybe he disappointed a lot of people in love with him last week. but i think the good thing about him is he has true core beliefs. there is a lot worse that you could have in washington today. >> andrea: i do doubt that the republican party will be able to pull the voters in the party. but from right thing to do perspective, i feel like is it the right thing to do. maybe that's just because of my father's story and i see how hard he worked. i do see that there is dependency issues. i get that with every gender and ethnicity. i get that. everybody is susceptible to
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
is some bigger space and some room for doing actual education. so, we have made it this far and we have more to do after this and we just are hopeful that you will also see that this is a good use of a public building for many people. thank you. >> thank you. >>> questions? >> there may be questions for you later. thank you. opening up for public comment, timothy thin, steve griffin, john goldman, kathleen mull duffin, and kathrin nemeth. >>> hello, thank you for letting me speak. my name is tim thin. i've lived down the street from the church for 25 years. they've been an excellent neighbor and did a good job of reaching out to the neighborhood on their previous project. i have consulted with a number of neighbors who could not be here tonight. their main concern is actually the traffic situation. the change of child care facility from 15 to 45 kids is tripling the capacity of that facy. there is no parking, there is no loading zone. and, you know, it's changing the church from a church to a day care center to a school. and as i understand there is no staff to manage the drop-offs and
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
educational technology like broadband that our students need to succeed. this plan creates an infrastructure bank to leverage public funds with private investment. it invests in our workers by making sure they have the skills and training they need to move into the 3.6 million jobs businesses across the country are trying to fill. and it is fully paid for by closing loopholes and cutting unfair spending in the tax code that mainly benefits the well off and well connected. our budget also makes sure we are not reducing our fiscal deficit while increasing our deficits in education and skills and infrastructure and innovation. while cutting spending responsibly overall, it protects our investments in national middle class and economic priorities like our schools and our roads and bridges and our clean energy and manufacturing industries. mr. president, this budget puts jobs first and our economy first and foremost, but it also builds on the work we've done over the last two years to tackle our deficit and debt responsibly. you know, in 2010, president obama established the national commission o
of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. similarly if we want to get down to the local level and address this issue, we've got to teach our kids that the sooner that you embrace difference and understand that your muslim classmate or your seat classmate or your gay classmate or your limited english professor classmate might be tomorrow's ceo or today's best friend of yours, the better off we will be. you have a leg up, having done about 30 jury trials across this country and seen interactions between people of diverse backgrounds. >> and here we try to celebrate, not just embrace, our diversity. celebrate all our interesting diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or d
the subject and get educated on the subject yourself so you can learn how it handle it and really talk to your children about it can be fun, it can be dangerous, these new toys that we have. >> wow. all right, i'd like to introduce the members of our panel today, rob is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will testify it continues. it hits the comm
into education and suddenly everyone was crying. it's a really amazing moment. so i think those moments are really important. the other thing you asked about with the parent when sunset is referring to alex's dad. >> they are referring to his mom and dad being upset with him for not standing up for himself, i just wanted to cringe. >> what's clear is when dad said if you don't make a stop, this could happen to your little sister. then the sister gets in on it and it's, like, just puts the, as sisters will do, but i think as a, as someone who was a boy and had difficult conversations with my dad, i really really remember that sort of punch them, make it go away. a lot of families will give that advice. i'm not even convinced that's the wrong advice, the problem is when they doesn't work, then they shut down and quit coming to you because they are afraid it's a double disappointment. they can't please their peers and find friendship and then they so don't want to lose their fathers as well, this boy-father thing is so deep. >> every single person in this room wants to start making a di
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
center wgbh educational foundation] [clicking and boinging.. >> announcer: the following is a paid program for brainetics. >> woman: can you imagine squaring a three-digit number in your head without a calculator? >> man: 483 squared. >> 2-3-3-2-8-9? >> man: awesome. >> woman: how about solving advanced equations off the top of your head like these sixth graders? >> man: go guys! >> girl: oh! >> man: yeah? >> o.k., so it's 2-6-3-1-6-9. >> man: good! >> point 6-1-5-3-8-4-6. >> man: good. >> 3-5-9-8-5-6. >> good! o.k., you're awesome! [girls squea [man laugh >> woman: these ordinary kids have learned to use their brains in extraordinary ways. with brainetics, the breakthrough math and memory learning system developed by math genius mike byster. >> brainetics teaches you every important learning tool that is not taught in schools. how to focus, how to concentrate, how to problem solve, how to memorize anything. when you have these tools and use them to your advantage, your mind becomes incredibly powerful. >> woman: these kids are seeing just how fun and cool learning can be and it's
education advisory board the leaders ofte these universities as to the occur at our can target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becomes your asset to gather the secrets in the cyber arena. it is just as easy to have somebody familiar with a cyberworld sitting in shanghai are beijing where some place in russia to attack the networks and export the information. a third is more substantial than it was a tenor 15 years ago. substantial is more than it was 10 or 15 years ago. rote to youto -- w about security lapses at the nasa centers. i saw that the fbi and dhs were involved and in the apprehension of a credible individual being held. you have any comments about that case? think it is indicative of the threat he mentioned. the arrest occurred over the weekend and is now in of the court proceeding . happening at nasa langley and i saw your testimony last week's with regard to clapper with regard to china, ames or be happening at places?rd or other
) we weren't educated properly about the drugs. (woman) we are get told that it's bad for you and you don't hear anything else. (man)and yesterday we got into trouble because of (woman) there's no alternative like fair trade, or ethically friendly cocaine yet so we don't have a choice. >>yes, western societies have to take responsibility for the high level of demand in their er, amongst their citizens. if you're a cocaine user, you can either, confront the fact, and acknowledge that the commodity you buy comes from a dirty trade and has real ramifications down the line, or you can say well, to your governments, give me a legitimate way to buy this substance. people will always take drugs. we just need to manage that phenomenon in a way that is the best for society. [ music ] >> bill: hey, good morning, friends and neighbors. and a happy wednesday. wednesday, march 20th. great to have you with us here on the "full-court press" on current tv. wedge to the program. welcome to your program where you get to not only find out what's going on around the world here in our nation's c
away because se quest traditiqu. >> the educational grant for service member's children, killed in the wars, the tuition assistance to service members now in terms of their own education, those things getting cut are directly because of the sequester. do you think they should be fixed even if the rest of the sequester couldn't be fixed? even if we can't fix everything else? >> the letter to the secretary to ask him to please fix this issue with the tuition regardless on where sequestration is. >> it is ten years today from the date that we innovated iraq and you and i have talked a number of times, politics in the iraq war and there's a real distance between those of white house didn't fight and those who did and sacrificed so much. ten years out, what do you think the lessons are we still need to learn as a country. >> i think the lesson with we need to learn is real questions of information that's being given to you. i feel very strongly that in the run up to iraq, not only were the american people lied to, that the members of congress were lied to. i think a lot of members of
for an interim government they hope will be formed within a month. >> the u.s.-educated i.t. executive was chosen by a majority of national coalition members in istanbul. in his first speech, he ruled out dialogue with the shock assad's regime. government troops and rebel fighters are blaming each other for a chemical attack near the northern city of aleppo -- dialogue with bashar alabama assad's regime. >> they accuse rebel fighters of launching a missile containing poisonous gases. the information minister said this type of weapon was prohibited under international law. >> so far, we have 16 martyrs and 86 wounded. most of them are in critical condition. the chemical contained in the missile causes immediate fainting, convulsion, and that. >> in istanbul, syria's main opposition group said they were looking at the attack rejected allegations that rebels were involved. we also know the rebels do not have access to chemical weapons. they would not have access to the means of launching these kind of chemical weapons. >> we have no details yet. we are against using chemical weapons from any side. i
support for girls education. today the girl said wearing a school uniform again makes her very happy. >>> coming up, another campus massacre avoided by a quick- thinking student. the frightening confrontation that likely saved a lot of lives. >> a mainstay of military weaponly sidelined after a deadly accident. what happened during a training exercise at a remote nevada base. >> we are helping facilitate what is in the economy. >> and the trickle up economics that is fueling the bay area recovery. how small businesses are building the boom one job at a time. >>> with the smirk on his face and a t-shirt with the word, killer scrolled on it, an ohio teenager appeared in court to hear his sentence for killing three classmates last year. 18-year-old, t.j. lane turned to the victim's families if court, cursed and made an obscene gesture. sentenced him to life in prison. he was not eligible for the death penalty because he was a minor when he opened fire on students in his high school cafeteria. the mother of one of the students killed called lane a quote, pathetic excuse for a human be
confirmed that day or another educator they know are taking some action and getting the training they need to keep a gun. >> a 27 year veteran of firearms, he's taught hundreds of people in the bay area how to shoot a gun. the former marine corps has been teaching based for a dozen years in the last couple of months, he says he's seen a new kind of client. teachers. >> new town really was the turning point. >> he described a dramatic jump making up his customer base. >> it's less than one percent. >> approaching him with one may question in mind. >> are these things really as scary as everybody says? >> he says teachers are also going to classes together. jonathan ray isn't advocating armed teachers on campus, but says it could prevent from trying to target schools. >> even if there's anyone who has a gun, it's a psychological deterrent. >> what's next? armed guards at starbucks and little league games? >> a local level possible in the district. administrators, teachers, parents. >> that's the idea in south dakota where the governor signed a bill into law this month giving individual schoo
the catholic church. >>> an american educated i.t. manager will become the prime minister for the opposition in syria. ghassan hitto lived in the u.s. for decades but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of fighting between rebels and president bashar al assad's forces. analysts say some in the coalition see hitto as an outsider. they also doubt rebel groups which are not part of the coalition will accept an interim government. >>> people across iraq are looking back at a war that caused many problems. u.s. forces invaded their country. saddam hussein collapsed, but it continued on much longer. nhk world's sho beppu covered the war and its aftermath. he's now back in baghdad. sho, how are things in the iraqi capital now? >> reporter: right. i can say that it changed quite a lo
, energy, the environment and education. also the cpc does not want to cut entitlements. and, wants to give unemployed americans 99 weeks of cash compensation. nearly two years. the question is what does president obama think of the congressional progressive caucus? my opinion, he likes it i don't think the president believes that crew is fanatical because they want what he wants. by the way, the far left kooks do want to cut one thing, defense spending. they want to bring that back down to 2006 level. somewhere in iran is cheering. there comes a point when americans are going to have to decide what country, what kind of country they want. even taking half of what affluent americans earn, feds couldn't possibly afford what the far left wants to provide. so we would eventually become greece or cyprus if the u.s. dollar collapses and people stop lending us money. some conservatives believe that's exactly what the far left wants. a collapse of the entire capitalistic system. some on the right believe that president obama is actively working toward that. certainly senator bernie sanders of verm
if and only if the class is full on campus. the academic says this will privatize public higher education with no quality criminal. >> state investigators are reprimand kaiser permanente for mismanaging their mental health services. officials say they make patients wait too long between appointments and dispenses inaccurate information, possibly discouraging patients from getting therapy. the information came to light in a recent report. state regulators have to decide if kaiser permanente will face fines. >> new statement on autism shows more cases than ever. one in 50 schoolchildren has autism, which includes language, social, and behavior challenges. the centers for disease control says this means a million americans children may have autism and they attribute the new higher estimates to high are awareness. the survey may impact the amount of time and money spent on supporting autistic kids. >> sugar drinks contribute to more than 180,000 deaths each year. researchers from harvard use data from health surveys around the globe and found sugar drinks linked to thousands of deaths from he
was this tarp -- discharged from hospital to start to rebuild her life. part of the process is education. the headmistress of her new school says everyone will try to make her time there as enjoyable as possible. >> she herself once to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think talking to her, it is something she very much missed during the time in the hospital, contact with her peer group. we aim that once she is in school, she will be a normal girl. >> although she knows the taliban has threatened to kill her if she ever returns to pakistan, she says she is determined to continue speaking about human-rights there. but for now, at least, she is looking forward to maki
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